zpravodajství životního prostředí již od roku 1999

The trouble with big data is the huge energy bill | John Naughton

26.11.2017
Příroda
The power consumed by the internet giants' massive server farms and the mining of the cryptocurrency are growing into a giant environmental headacheOnce upon a time, a very long time ago - 2009 in fact - there was a brief but interesting controversy about the carbon footprint of a Google search. It was kicked off by a newspaper story reporting a "calculation" of mysterious origin that suggested a single Google search generated 7 grams of CO2, which is about half of the carbon footprint of boiling a kettle. Irked by this, Google responded with a blogpost saying that this estimate was much too high. "In terms of greenhouse gases," the company said, "one Google search is equivalent to about 0.2 grams of CO2. The current EU standard for tailpipe [exhaust] emissions calls for 140 grams of CO2 per kilometre driven, but most cars don't reach that level yet. Thus, the average car driven for one kilometre (0.6 miles for those in the US) produces as many greenhouse gases as a thousand Google searches."Every service that Google provides is provided via its huge data centres, which consume vast amounts of electricity to power and cool the servers, and are therefore responsible for the emission of significant amounts of CO2. Since the advent of the modern smartphone in about 2007 our reliance on distant data centres has become total, because everything we do on our phones involves an interaction with the "cloud" and therefore has a carbon footprint. Continue reading...
Zdroj: The Guardian

Komentáře k článku. Co si myslí ostatní?
Další zprávy z internetu




Další články
Podněty ZmapujTo
Mohlo by vás také zajímat
Naši partneři
Složky životního prostředí